New computational method opens window into immune cell behavior

Immune cells have many jobs to do: Some identify infected cells and eliminate them. Others help rein in inflammation to prevent damage to healthy tissue. And many are critical components of cancer treatment. Researchers know ...

Nanoparticles could boost cancer immunotherapy

Boosting function of natural killer cells with magnetic nanoparticles could make cancer immunotherapy more efficient, according to a Northwestern Medicine study published in ACS Nano.

How promiscuous protein droplets regulate immune genes

Biochemists at Emory are achieving insights into how an important regulator of the immune system switches its function, based on its orientation and local environment. New research demonstrates that the glucocorticoid receptor ...

How density governs receptor activation on immune cells

Scientists from within the Antibody and Vaccine Group at the University of Southampton have gained novel insights into how an important class of immune receptors called tumor necrosis factor receptors (TNFR) are activated.

How long-known genes continue to surprise researchers

The human genome was sequenced around 20 years ago. Since then, the sequence information encoding our proteins is known—at least in principle. However, this information is not continuously stored in the individual genes, ...

Receptor location in heart plays a key role in their function

In the heart there are two different subtypes of beta-adrenergic receptors—beta1 and beta2—which are activated by the stress hormones adrenaline and noradrenaline. They both trigger the strongest stimulation of the heart ...

Why moms take risks to protect their infants

It might seem like a given that mothers take extra risks to protect their children, but have you ever wondered why? A new study led by Kumi Kuroda at the RIKEN Center for Brain Science (CBS) in Japan shows that in mice, this ...

page 1 from 30

Receptor (biochemistry)

In biochemistry, a receptor is a protein molecule, embedded in either the plasma membrane or cytoplasm of a cell, to which a mobile signaling (or "signal") molecule may attach. A molecule which binds to a receptor is called a "ligand," and may be a peptide (such as a neurotransmitter), a hormone, a pharmaceutical drug, or a toxin, and when such binding occurs, the receptor undergoes a conformational change which ordinarily initiates a cellular response. However, some ligands merely block receptors without inducing any response (e.g. antagonists). Ligand-induced changes in receptors result in physiological changes which constitute the biological activity of the ligands.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA