Shape-morphing living composites

In a recent study published on Science Advances, L. K. Rivera-Tarazona and a research team in the departments of bioengineering and biological sciences at the University of Texas, Dallas, U.S., established a new method to ...

Cellular microRNA detection with miRacles

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short noncoding regulatory RNAs that can repress gene expression post-transcriptionally and are therefore increasingly used as biomarkers of disease. Detecting miRNAs can be arduous and expensive as ...

'Quadruple helix' DNA discovered in human cells

In 1953, Cambridge researchers Watson and Crick published a paper describing the interweaving 'double helix' DNA structure - the chemical code for all life. Now, in the year of that scientific landmark's 60th Anniversary, ...

Carbon Nanotubes Boost Cancer-Fighting Cells

(PhysOrg.com) -- Yale University engineers have found that the defects in carbon nanotubes cause T cell antigens to cluster in the blood and stimulate the body's natural immune response. Their findings, which appear as the ...

Small evolutionary shifts make big impacts, study finds

(PhysOrg.com) -- In the developing fetus, cell growth follows a very specific schedule. In the eye's retina, for example, cones -- which help distinguish color during the day -- develop before the more light-sensitive rods ...

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Cell growth

The term cell growth is used in the contexts of cell development and cell division (reproduction). When used in the context of cell division, it refers to growth of cell populations, where one cell (the "mother cell") grows and divides to produce two "daughter cells".

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