Environmental oxygen triggers loss of webbed digits

Free fingers have many obvious advantages on land, such as in locomotion and grasping, while webbed fingers are typical of aquatic or gliding animals. But both amphibians and amniotes—which include mammals, reptiles, and ...

How the cell protects itself

The cell contains transcripts of genetic material, which migrate from the cell nucleus to another part of the cell. This movement protects the genetic transcripts from the recruitment of "spliceosomes." If this protection ...

A platform for Africa's mobile innovators

Sam Gikandi '05 SM '06 and Eston Kimani '05 have always believed in the potential of Africa's entrepreneurial community. Their years at MIT, beginning in 2001 when they left their home country of Kenya, only reinforced that ...

Cellular rivalry promotes healthy skin development

Not all cells are destined for greatness. Deemed unfit to serve in the body, some are killed off during early development through a process called cell competition. This phenomenon has previously been documented in flies ...

Early in vitro testing for adverse effects on embryos

ETH researchers have combined embryonic cells and liver cells in a new cell culture test. This combination lets them detect adverse effects that new medications may have on embryos early on in the drug development process.

Revealing branching time in single-cell omics data

New single-cell omics technology allows scientists to analyse cell development in ways that were not previously possible. Researchers can now identify never-before-seen patterns and phenomena across large quantities of cells—receiving ...

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