Following Neanderthals' footsteps to learn how they lived

Like modern humans and primates, Neanderthals—our closest evolutionary cousins—are thought to have lived in groups, but their size and composition have been difficult to infer from archeological and fossil remains.

Ground shaking during devastating flood offers new insights

A devastating wall of water gushed down the Bhotekoshi/Sunkoshi River in Nepal on July 5, 2016. It came from a lake that had been dammed by a glacial moraine, but the dam broke and discharged more than 100,000 tons of water ...

Technology to help weather bushfires, floods and more

While technology can't prevent catastrophic events, a CSIRO report released in Canberra today reveals how emerging technologies help emergency services better manage natural disasters and minimise their effects on people, ...

Unravelling the reasons why mass extinctions occur

Scientists from the University of Leicester have shed new light on why mass extinctions have occurred through history—and how this knowledge could help in predicting upcoming ecological catastrophes.

The art of the Roman deal

Romans are depicted as slashing and burning their way across countries in order to secure their empire. But a University of Michigan archeologist suggests that the Romans may have trapped more flies with honey.

page 2 from 4