Nanotube forests drink water from arid air

(Phys.org) —If you don't want to die of thirst in the desert, be like the beetle. Or have a nanotube cup handy. New research by scientists at Rice University demonstrated that forests of carbon nanotubes can be made to ...

Champagne physicist reveals the secrets of bubbly

Gerard Liger-Belair lives in a bubble, and he doesn't care who knows it. Bubbles are his passion. And they have given the 41-year-old French scientist arguably the best job in all of physics.

'Dry water' could make a big splash commercially

An unusual substance known as "dry water," which resembles powdered sugar, could provide a new way to absorb and store carbon dioxide, the major greenhouse gas that contributes to global warming, scientists reported today ...

Trending science: Vitamin B3 may have been delivered from space

The results of laboratory experiments involving Vitamin B3 by a team of NASA researchers support a theory that the origin of life may have been assisted by a supply of 'biologically important molecules produced in space and ...

Smallest possible diamonds form ultra-thin nanothreads

For the first time, scientists have discovered how to produce ultra-thin "diamond nanothreads" that promise extraordinary properties, including strength and stiffness greater than that of today's strongest nanotubes and polymers. ...

Carbon's magnetic personality: Persistent, but only skin-deep

(PhysOrg.com) -- It's a mainstay in biological molecules, but carbon isn't the kind of element you'd expect to find in a permanent magnet. Until now. Not only does carbon become magnetized with a little doctoring, as discovered ...

Radiation damage spreads among close neighbors

A single X-ray can unravel an enormous molecule, physicists report in the March 17 issue of Physical Review Letters. Their findings could lead to safer medical imaging and a more nuanced understanding of the electronics of ...

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