Porous materials unfavorable for coronavirus survival

As COVID-19 spreads via respiratory droplets, researchers have become increasingly interested in the drying of droplets on impermeable and porous surfaces. Surfaces that accelerate evaporation can decelerate the spread of ...

Science of building sandcastles finally understood

Water vapor from ambient air will spontaneously condense inside porous materials or between touching surfaces. But with the liquid layer being only a few molecules thick, this phenomenon has lacked understanding, until now.

Solving the mysteries of water and air underground

Stand outside and look underneath your feet. There, perhaps under some grass, is the soil. On a dry day, all the spaces in the soil are filled with air. And some distance further down, those spaces are entirely water. So ...

New test strip preserves clues that blood tests often miss

A new synthetic paper for finger prick blood tests could provide accurate point-of-care diagnostics for cancer, COVID-19 and other serious diseases. Researchers at KTH Royal Institute of Technology say the innovation allows ...

Measuring the sound of a soap bubble popping

A team of researchers from Sorbonne Université and the University of Lille has measured the sounds that occur when a soap bubble pops. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the group describes ...

Catalyst deposition on fragile chips

Electrocatalysts can help to obtain chemicals from renewable raw materials or to use alternative energy sources. But testing new catalysts brings challenges.

High-gravity water waves

What might look like jelly being stirred is actually water subjected to 20 times normal Earth gravity within ESA's Large Diameter Centrifuge—as part of an experiment giving new insight into the behavior of wave turbulence.

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