These tiny, self-assembling traps capture PFAS

University at Buffalo chemists have shown that self-assembling molecular traps can be used to capture PFAS—dangerous pollutants that have contaminated drinking water supplies around the world.

Making puffer fish toxin in a flask

In Japan, puffer fish is considered a delicacy, but the tickle to the taste buds comes with a tickle to the nerves: fugu contains tetrodotoxin, a strong nerve toxin. In low doses, tetrodotoxin is shown in clinical trials ...

Porous liquid holds bigger molecules

An international team of chemists has developed a method for creating an ionic-liquid, porous, tetrahedral coordination cage that holds larger molecules than other porous liquids. In their paper published in the journal Nature ...

New cages to trap molecules push boundaries of protein design

Protein design is a popular and rapidly growing field, with scientists engineering novel protein cages—capsule-like nanostructures for purposes such as gene therapy and targeted drug delivery. Many of these structures fashioned ...

'Russian doll' molecules could really clean up

The Nitschke Group at the University of Cambridge designs hollow molecules that act as capsules or cages that enclose guest molecules. These cages have exciting potential applications in a variety of fields. They could, for ...

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