Related topics: neurons · worms

Long-lived parents produce better quality offspring

Genetic manipulation that more than doubles lifespan also leads to better offspring—according to new collaborative research from the University of East Anglia and Uppsala University.

Adaptive models capture complexity of the brain and behavior

For the scientists that study animal behavior, even the simplest roundworm poses huge challenges. The movement of squirming worms, flocking birds and walking humans changes from moment to moment, in ways that the naked eye ...

Team develops first genetic switch for C. elegans

With their first ever RNA-based inducible system for switching on genes in the roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans), two researchers from the University of Konstanz have closed a significant gap in genetic switches. ...

Researchers unravel 3-D locomotion of the nematode C. elegans

Jerzy Blawzdziewicz, professor, associate chairman and director of graduate studies in the Department of Mechanical Engineering, and Siva Vanapalli, an associate professor and Bill Sanderson faculty fellow in the Department ...

Survival mode in a tiny worm's brain

Caenorhabditis elegans, or C. elegans, are tiny worms with tiny brains—their whole bodies are the width of a pencil tip and contain only 302 neurons. These nematodes live out their two-week-long lifespans in rotting vegetation, ...

Roundworms even more useful than researchers previously thought

The one millimetre long roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans has been used as a model organism in scientific research, and has therefore been extensively examined. A research group at Uppsala University has now demonstrated that ...

Worms point way toward viral strategies

Rice University structural biologist Yizhi Jane Tao and geneticist Weiwei Zhong have won a prestigious National Institutes of Health R01 grant to study how the Orsay virus infects a specific worm.

Tracking worm sex drive, neuron by neuron

The males prowl a dark, crowded space. Using a mix of instinct and sensory cues, they pursue potential mates. But how do they decide when to make their move? New findings answer that question, at least for the tiny soil-dwelling ...

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