Tool predicts rogue waves up to five minutes in advance

A new tool that can be used to predict the emergence of unusually large and unpredictable waves at sea—known as rogue waves—up to five minutes into the future is presented in a study published in Scientific Reports. The ...

Buoy oh buoy! Floating instruments receive major upgrade

A PNNL research team has upgraded the instrumentation on two lidar buoys used to capture data that help advance the scientific understanding of offshore wind and its energy-producing potential. The buoys were equipped with ...

New data reveals significance of Perth super storm

Two drifting wave buoys deployed along the coast of Western Australia by researchers at The University of Western Australia have highlighted the significance of Perth's recent super storm, recording massive waves along 1000km ...

New Indonesia tsunami network could add crucial minutes

Indonesia's tsunami detection system, made up of seafloor sensors that communicate with transmitting buoys on the surface, has been rendered useless by vandals and lack of funding. Now Indonesian and U.S. scientists say they've ...

Shark-spotting sonar technology put to the test

Primary Industries Minister Niall Blair has announced the NSW Government is collaborating with UTS researchers to assess the capabilities of the Clever Buoy shark-spotting sonar technology off Port Stephens, as part of the ...

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Buoy

A buoy ( /ˈbɔɪ/, also /ˈbwɔɪ/ or US /ˈbuːiː/) is a floating device that can have many different purposes. It can be anchored (stationary) or allowed to drift. The word, of Old French or Middle Dutch origin, is now most commonly /ˈbɔɪ/ (identical with boy, also as in buoyancy) in UK English, although some orthoepists have traditionally prescribed the pronunciation /ˈbwɔɪ/. The pronunciation /ˈbuːiː/, while chiefly American, more closely resembles the modern French bouée [bwe].

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