Graphene crinkles can be used as 'molecular zippers'

A decade ago, scientists noticed something very strange happening when buckyballs—soccer ball shaped carbon molecules—were dumped onto a certain type of multilayer graphene, a flat carbon nanomaterial. Rather than rolling ...

Buckyballs offer environmental benefits

Treated buckyballs not only remove valuable but potentially toxic metal particles from water and other liquids, but also reserve them for future use, according to scientists at Rice University.

Organic polymers show sunny potential

(Phys.org) —A new version of solar cells created by laboratories at Rice and Pennsylvania State universities could open the door to research on a new class of solar energy devices.

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Buckminsterfullerene

Buckminsterfullerene is a spherical fullerene molecule with the formula C60. It was first intentionally prepared in 1985 by Harold Kroto, James Heath, Sean O'Brien, Robert Curl and Richard Smalley at Rice University. Kroto, Curl, and Smalley were awarded the 1996 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their roles in the discovery of buckminsterfullerene and the related class of molecules, the fullerenes. The name is a homage to Richard Buckminster Fuller, whose geodesic domes it resembles. Buckminsterfullerene was the first fullerene molecule discovered and it is also the most common in terms of natural occurrence, as it can be found in small quantities in soot.

Buckminsterfullerene is the largest matter to have been shown to exhibit wave–particle duality.

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