Controlling genes with your thoughts

Researchers led by ETH Zurich professor Martin Fussenegger have constructed the first gene network that can be controlled by our thoughts. The inspiration for this development was a game that picks up brainwaves in order ...

Mind-controlled games on show at Asia's biggest IT fair

Finger fatigue after hours of video gaming may become a thing of the past, as firms unveil headsets that measures users' brainwaves and allow them to interact with apps installed in computers.

Brainwave headband makes debut at Paris LeWeb meet

(Phys.org)—A Canadian company is talking about having a window, aka computer screen, into your mind. Another of the many ways to put it—they believe your computer can be so into you. And vice-versa. InteraXon, a Canadian ...

EEG helmet is being developed as interrogation device

(Phys.org) -- Veritas Scientific is working on an EEG helmet that carries a slideshow of images that could, they hope, reliably identify an enemy. The device is shaped like a motorcycle-helmet with metal brush sensors that ...

A brainy innovation takes flight

A team of Northeastern University engineering students has developed a system that allows a pilot to fly a simulated airplane using nothing more than his or her brainwaves — a program that has piqued military and private-sector ...

Electroencephalography

Electroencephalography (EEG) is the recording of electrical activity along the scalp. EEG measures voltage fluctuations resulting from ionic current flows within the neurons of the brain. In clinical contexts, EEG refers to the recording of the brain's spontaneous electrical activity over a short period of time, usually 20–40 minutes, as recorded from multiple electrodes placed on the scalp. In neurology, the main diagnostic application of EEG is in the case of epilepsy, as epileptic activity can create clear abnormalities on a standard EEG study. A secondary clinical use of EEG is in the diagnosis of coma, encephalopathies, and brain death. EEG used to be a first-line method for the diagnosis of tumors, stroke and other focal brain disorders, but this use has decreased with the advent of anatomical imaging techniques with high (<1 mm) spatial resolution like as MRI and CT. Despite limited spatial resolution, EEG continues to be a valuable tool for research and diagnosis, especially when millisecond-range temporal resolution (not possible with CT or MRI) is required.

Derivatives of the EEG technique include evoked potentials (EP), which involves averaging the EEG activity time-locked to the presentation of a stimulus of some sort (visual, somatosensory, or auditory). Event-related potentials (ERPs) refer to averaged EEG responses that are time-locked to more complex processing of stimuli; this technique is used in cognitive science, cognitive psychology, and psychophysiological research.

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