Plastic bottles solve Nigeria's housing problem

The idea undoubtedly seemed strange at first: take the plastic water bottles that litter Nigeria's roads, canals and gutters and allow people to live inside them.

How Much Energy Goes Into Making a Bottle of Water?

(PhysOrg.com) -- Most people who buy bottled water have access to clean drinking water virtually for free (in the US, tap water costs less than a penny per gallon, on average). Nevertheless, the consumption of bottled water ...

100-year-old Scotch pulled from frozen crate

(AP) -- A crate of Scotch whisky that was trapped in Antarctic ice for a century was finally opened Friday - but the heritage dram won't be tasted by whisky lovers because it's being preserved for its historical significance.

Study confirms water quality in glass and plastic bottles

Bottled water sold in Spain is practically free of constituents given off by plastic packaging or glass bottle lids. They are only detected in some cases, albeit in quantities much lower than limits found harmful for health. ...

World's oldest champagne uncorked

Wine experts have popped the corks of two bottles of champagne salvaged from the bottom of the Baltic Sea, where they had lain in a sunken ship for nearly 200 years.

Face masks are a ticking plastic timebomb

Recent studies estimate that we use an astounding 129 billion face masks globally every month—that is 3 million a minute. Most of them are disposable face masks made from plastic microfibers.

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Bottle

A bottle is a rigid container with a neck that is narrower than the body and a "mouth". By contrast, a jar has a relatively large mouth or opening. Bottles are often made of glass, clay, plastic, aluminum or other impervious materials, and typically used to store liquids such as water, milk, soft drinks, beer, wine, cooking oil, medicine, shampoo, ink, and chemicals. A device applied in the bottling line to seal the mouth of a bottle is termed an external bottle cap, closure, or internal stopper. A bottle can also be sealed by a conductive "innerseal" by using induction sealing.

The bottle has developed over millennia of use, with some of the earliest examples appearing in China, Phoenicia, Rome and Crete. The Chinese used bottles to store liquids. Bottles are often recycled according to the SPI recycling code for the material. Some regions have a legally mandated deposit which is refunded after returning the bottle to the retailer.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA