Small birds discern threat level of enemies

Chickadees and titmice don't just see that another bird is dangerous. They can also differentiate species and tell just how much of a threat they are.

White cheeks are more titillating

Male blue tits with white cheeks are healthier and more likely to mate with higher quality partners than their counterparts with duller cheek feathers. Having purer white cheeks also indicates that a blue tit was better able ...

Caterpillars key to urban blue tits' low breeding

Many animal species suffer reduced reproductive success in urban habitats, despite wide-spread supplementation of breeding and feeding opportunities. In some years, the breeding success of city birds is devastatingly low.

Female blue tits sing in the face of danger

Birdsong has long been associated with courtship or competitive behaviour. And males were often considered to be a more active singing partner than females. A team of researchers from the Vetmeduni Vienna now shows that female ...

Do female birds mate with multiple males to protect their young?

Blue tit females mate with more than one male. Several possible blue tit fathers may then work together to stop predators from attacking their young, according to new research from the University of Bergen. Philosopher Claus ...

Small birds' vision: Not so sharp but superfast

One may expect a creature that darts around its habitat to be capable of perceiving rapid changes as well. Yet birds are famed more for their good visual acuity. Joint research by Uppsala University, Stockholm University ...

Nest size variation not related to breeding success

Contrary to expectations, the size of the Blue Tits' nests is unrelated to their breeding success. The researchers behind a forthcoming study in The Auk: Ornithological Advances spent 18 years making more than 1,200 measurements ...

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