Linking humans with blue carbon ecosystems

Social vulnerabilities of coastal communities and their reliance on blue carbon ecosystem services may be improved by addressing three major factors, according to a study led by Hokkaido University researchers.

Scientists take step to improve crops' photosynthesis, yields

In order to feed a projected 9 billion people by 2050, farmers need to grow 50% more food on a limited amount of arable land. As a result, plant scientists are in a race against time to engineer crops with higher yields by ...

Chemists discover a key to greener food production

Arguably the most important (if least well known) industrial advancement of the 20th century, the Haber-Bosch ammonia synthesis process essentially conquered food scarcity by creating the means to mass produce fertilizer—fertilizer ...

Climate change increases coastal blue carbon sequestration

Coastal Blue Carbon (BC), which includes mangrove and saltmarsh tidal wetlands, of which was first coined a decade ago to describe the disproportionately large contribution of coastal vegetated ecosystems to global carbon ...

Methane in tidal marshes

A pair of University of Delaware researchers were studying "blue carbon"—the carbon stored in coastal ecosystems such as mangrove forests, salt marshes or sea grasses—when they found something no one expected to see in ...

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