Related topics: women

Simple model captures almost 100 years of measles dynamics in London

A simple epidemiological model accurately captures long-term measles transmission dynamics in London, including major perturbations triggered by historical events. Alexander Becker of Princeton University in New Jersey, U.S., ...

A toxic truth: lead exposure problems linger in soil, air

The water crisis in Flint, Michigan—which began in 2014 but to this day has not been completely resolved—brought the public health and economic costs of lead exposure into sharp focus. The crisis sparked conversations ...

Climate change threat to dolphins' survival

An unprecedented marine heatwave had long-lasting negative impacts on both survival and birth rates for the iconic dolphin population in Shark Bay, Western Australia. Researchers at UZH have now documented that climate change ...

Is gene editing ethical? It depends

One of Matthew Liao's most popular papers proposes that humans could genetically engineer themselves to collectively reduce our species' carbon footprint.

page 1 from 6

Birth rate

Crude birth rate is the nativity or childbirths per 1,000 people per year.

It can be represented by number of childbirths in that year, and p is the current population. This figure is combined with the crude death rate to produce the rate of natural population growth (natural in that it does not take into account net migration).

As of 2007[update], the average birth rate for the whole world is 20.3 per year per 1000 total population, which for a world population of 6.5 billion comes to 134 million babies per year.

Another indicator of fertility that is frequently used is the total fertility rate, which is the average number of children born to each woman over the course of her life. In general, the total fertility rate is a better indicator of (current) fertility rates because unlike the crude birth rate it is not affected by the age distribution of the population.

Fertility rates tend to be higher in less economically developed countries and lower in more economically developed countries.

The birth rate is an item of concern and policy for a number of national governments. Some, including those of Italy and Malaysia, seek to increase the national birth rate using measures such as financial incentives or provision of support services to new mothers. Conversely, others aim to reduce the birth rate. For example, China's One child policy; measures such as improved information about and availability of birth control have achieved similar results in countries such as Iran.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA