Clever cockatoos learn through social interaction

For the first time, a team of international scientists have proven that cockatoos, an iconic Australian bird species, learn from each other a unique skill—lifting garbage bin lids to gather food. The world-first research ...

Prairie dogs kiss more when being watched

(PhysOrg.com) -- Researchers in the US studying the behavior of black-tailed prairie dogs at a local zoo have discovered they behave differently, kissing and cuddling each other more when people are watching than when they ...

African grey parrots may have better self-control than macaws

African grey parrots may be better able than macaws to delay gratification—rejecting an immediate reward in favor of a better one in the future—according to a study published in the journal Animal Cognition.

Jays found to be sensitive to cognitive illusions

A team of researchers working at the University of Cambridge, has found that Eurasian jays are sensitive to cognitive illusions designed to fool humans. In their paper published in the journal Royal Society Open Science, ...

Sharing the love helps male acorn woodpeckers father more chicks

A new long-term study led by Sahas Barve, a Peter Buck Fellow at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History, finds that male acorn woodpeckers breeding polygamously in duos or trios of males actually fathered more ...

Unraveling the mechanisms that control parental care in birds

When animals become parents, they often need to change their behaviors in ways that allow them to protect and ensure the survival of their offspring. What happens in the brain when an animal becomes a new parent?

Some birds observed stealing hair from living mammals

Dozens of online videos document an unusual behavior among tufted titmice and their closest bird kin. A bird will land on an unsuspecting mammal and, cautiously and stealthily, pluck out some of its hair.

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