Study traces evolution of acoustic communication

Imagine taking a hike through a forest or a stroll through a zoo and not a sound fills the air, other than the occasional chirp from a cricket. No birds singing, no tigers roaring, no monkeys chattering, and no human voices, ...

Eagle Owls Send Sweeter Valentines When Moon Is Full

(PhysOrg.com) -- Placing a tracking device on breeding owls with a wing span large enough to cover eight humans lined up side-by-side, is not a walk in the park. But, funded by a grant from the Spanish Ministry of Science ...

Maths experts question key ecological theory

Mathematicians at the University of York in the UK and the University of Canterbury in New Zealand say they have disproved a widely accepted theory underpinning the operation of complex networks of interactions in the natural ...

Even singers in the bird world have to deal with cover artists

(PhysOrg.com) -- Two competing species of Amazonian birds use the same songs to communicate with each other, Oxford University scientists have found, the first evidence that convergent evolution can arise through social interactions ...

Mojave birds crashed over last century due to climate change

Bird communities in the Mojave Desert straddling the California/Nevada border have collapsed over the past 100 years, most likely because of lower rainfall due to climate change, according to a new University of California, ...

Snooping on neighbours gives animals the upper paw

(Phys.org) —Animals that have developed the ability to eavesdrop on their neighbours may have the edge when it comes to finding food and expanding their habitat, a new study by researchers at The University of Western Australia ...

Shake your tail feather: Sexual signaling in birds

(PhysOrg.com) -- Patterned feathers, previously thought to be used only for camouflage in birds, can play an important role in attracting a mate and fending off rivals, a University of Melbourne study reveals.

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