Novel electrochemical biosensor for early cancer detection

Exosomes as potential biomarkers in liquid biopsy hold great potential for early cancer diagnosis and monitoring of highly metastatic cancer cells. Recently, a group of researchers proposed a novel electrochemical biosensor ...

Building better gas-phase biosensors for fight against diseases

Scientists from the Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) introduce an easy method for manufacturing biosensors made from electrospun polymers. By embedding enzymes inside the polymer string, the enzymes were operational ...

Scientists hijack bacteria to ease drug manufacturing

For more affordable, sustainable drug options than we have today, the medication we take to treat high blood pressure, pain or memory loss may one day come from engineered bacteria, cultured in a vat like yogurt. And thanks ...

Detecting viruses in a pinprick

Scientists at Swansea University, Biovici Ltd and the National Physical Laboratory have developed a method to detect viruses in very small volumes.

Biosensors using field-effect transistors show great promise

Demand for sensitive and selective electronic biosensors—analytical devices that monitor a target of interest in real time—is growing for a wide range of applications. They are ideal for health care within clinical settings, ...

Thin, stretchable biosensors could make surgery safer

A research team from Los Alamos National Laboratory and Purdue University have developed bio-inks for biosensors that could help localize critical regions in tissues and organs during surgical operations.

Biosensors require robust antifouling protection

Some promising biosensors and medical devices work well within pristine laboratory environments. However, they tend to stop working to deliver medical therapeutics or monitor chronic health issues once exposed to the real-world ...

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Biosensor

A biosensor is a device for the detection of an analyte that combines a biological component with a physicochemical detector component.

It consists of 3 parts:

The most widespread example of a commercial biosensor is the blood glucose biosensor, which uses the enzyme glucose oxidase to break blood glucose down. In doing so it first oxidizes glucose and uses two electrons to reduce the FAD (a component of the enzyme) to FADH2. This in turn is oxidized by the electrode (accepting two electrons from the electrode) in a number of steps. The resulting current is a measure of the concentration of glucose. In this case, the electrode is the transducer and the enzyme is the biologically active component.

Recently, arrays of many different detector molecules have been applied in so called electronic nose devices, where the pattern of response from the detectors is used to fingerprint a substance. Current commercial electronic noses, however, do not use biological elements.

A canary in a cage, as used by miners to warn of gas could be considered a biosensor. Many of today's biosensor applications are similar, in that they use organisms which respond to toxic substances at a much lower level than us to warn us of their presence. Such devices can be used in environmental monitoring, trace gas detection and in water treatment facilities.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA