Developing new techniques to build biomaterials

Scientists at the University of Leeds have developed an approach that could help in the design of a new generation of synthetic biomaterials made from proteins.

New biomaterials can be fine-tuned for medical applications

Researchers in the UK and the United States have succeeded in 'fine tuning' a new thermoplastic biomaterial to enable both the rate at which it degrades in the body and its mechanical properties to be controlled independently.

Artificial 'inclusion bodies' created for controlled drug release

Precision medicine is becoming increasingly important, creating more efficient personalised therapies for each patient and innovative pharmacological developments. In the oncology field, for example, researchers are developing ...

'Just clicking' a molecule to a biomolecule for another function

Researchers have reported a material that controls the behavior of cells in a dynamic way, just as happens in biology. A new technique uses functional components that can be 'clicked' to a material using vitamin H. Researchers ...

Biomaterials smarten up with CRISPR

The CRISPR-Cas system has become the go-to tool for researchers who study genes in an ever-growing list of organisms, and is being used to develop new gene therapies that potentially can correct a defect at a single nucleotide ...

Enhanced human body response to implants

UPM researchers have developed a new surface treatment to reduce metallic biomaterial implant rejection. This will extend the prosthesis life and thus increase the quality of life for patients.

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Biomaterial

A biomaterial is any matter, surface, or construct that interacts with biological systems. The development of biomaterials, as a science, is about fifty years old. The study of biomaterials is called biomaterials science. It has experienced steady and strong growth over its history, with many companies investing large amounts of money into the development of new products. Biomaterials science encompasses elements of medicine, biology, chemistry, tissue engineering and materials science.

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