Related topics: plos one · cells · protein

Comb of a lifetime: A new method for fluorescence microscopy

Fluorescence microscopy is widely used in biochemistry and life sciences because it allows scientists to directly observe cells and certain compounds in and around them. Fluorescent molecules absorb light within a specific ...

How to identify heat-stressed corals

Researchers have found a novel way to identify heat-stressed corals, which could help scientists pinpoint the coral species that need protection from warming ocean waters linked to climate change, according to a Rutgers-led ...

Why do some birds lose flight more readily than others?

Back in 2012, Ryan Terrill was hiking down a dry canyon in central Bolivia, looking for Giant Antshrikes—the largest species of antbird—but he found himself, instead, thinking about another bird: the Titicaca Grebe.

Bacterial nanopores open the future of data storage

In 2020, each person in the world is producing about 1.7 megabytes of data every second. In just a single year, that amounts to 418 zettabytes—or 418 billion one-terabyte hard drives.

Science leaders issue clarion call for evidence-based policy

Since the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic, US science leaders and others have expressed frustration with the lack of an informed and coherent federal response, a sentiment that echoes objections to the handling of other ...

page 1 from 40

Biology

Biology (from Greek βιολογος - βίος, bios, "life"; -λογος, -logos, study of) is the science that studies living organisms. Prior to the nineteenth century, biology came under the general study of all natural objects called natural history.

The term biology was first coined by Gottfried Reinhold Treviranus.[citation needed] It is now a standard subject of instruction at schools and universities around the world, and over a million papers are published annually in a wide array of biology and medicine journals.

Biology examines the structure, function, growth, origin, evolution, distribution and classification of all living things. Five unifying principles form the foundation of modern biology: cell theory, evolution, gene theory, energy, and homeostasis.

Traditionally, the specialized disciplines of biology are grouped by the type of organism being studied: botany, the study of plants; zoology, the study of animals; and microbiology, the study of microorganisms.

These fields are further divided based on the scale at which organisms are studied and the methods used to study them: biochemistry examines the fundamental chemistry of life, molecular biology studies the complex interactions of systems of biological molecules, cellular biology examines the basic building block of all life, the cell; physiology examines the physical and chemical functions of the tissues and organ systems of an organism; and ecology examines how various organisms interrelate with their environment.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA