An evolutionary roll of the dice explains why we're not perfect

If evolution selects for the fittest organisms, why do we still have imperfections? Scientists at the Milner Centre for Evolution at the University of Bath investigating this question have found that in species with small ...

Time for a new contender in energy conversion and storage

Evolutionary search has helped scientists predict the lowest energy structure of a two-dimensional (2-D) material, B2P6, with some remarkable features, including structural anisotropy and Janus geometry.

Primate voice boxes are evolving at rapid pace

Scientists have discovered that the larynx, or voice box, of primates is significantly larger relative to body size, has greater variation, and is under faster rates of evolution than in other mammals.

How boundaries become bridges in evolution

There's a paradox within the theory of evolution: The life forms that exist today are here because they were able to change when past environments disappeared. Yet, organisms evolve to fit into specific environmental niches.

Did adaptive radiations shape reptile evolution?

Some of the most fundamental questions in evolution remain unanswered, such as when and how extremely diverse groups of animals—for example reptiles—first evolved. For seventy-five years, adaptive radiations—the relatively ...

Shell puzzle: An additional piece added to the evolution of turtles

The origin of turtles is among the most debated topics in evolutionary biology. In a recently published study in the journal Nature Scientific Reports, Senckenberg scientist Ingmar Werneburg, in cooperation with an international ...

How and when spines changed in mammalian evolution

A new study from Harvard University and the Field Museum of Natural History sheds light on how and when changes in the spine happened in mammal evolution. The research reveals how a combination of developmental changes and ...

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