When the extreme becomes the norm for Arctic animals

Think of reindeer on Norway's Svalbard archipelago as the arctic equivalent of sloths. It's not a perfect analogy, except that like tropical sloths, Svalbard reindeer move as little as possible to conserve energy.

Wagers winter plants make to survive

Spend water or save water? Grow or reproduce? For the tiny desert plants that bloom during the winter, the choices are life-or-death gambles, and ecologists at the University of Arizona have identified the wagers that will ...

Elevation shapes species survival in changing habitats

Luke Frishkoff, University of Texas at Arlington assistant professor of biology, explores how human land use expedites biodiversity loss in a paper recently published in Nature Ecology & Evolution.

Human impacts erode behavioral diversity in chimpanzees

Compared to other animals, chimpanzees show tremendous variation across groups in their behavior—from the types of tools they use in their feeding behavior to the specific gestures they use in communication. Research in ...

Climate-driven evolution in trees alters their ecosystems

A new study published in Global Change Biology and coauthored by researchers from UT, explores how climate, evolution, plants, and soils are linked. The research is the first to show how climate-driven evolution in tree populations ...

Unprecedented biological changes in the global ocean

Current monitoring of marine biological systems only covers a tiny fraction of the ocean, which limits scientists' ability to confidently predict the expected effects of climate disturbances on marine biodiversity. Using ...

Termites shape and are shaped by their mounds

Termite construction projects have no architects, engineers or foremen, and yet these centimeter-sized insects build complex, long-standing, meter-sized structures all over the world. How they do it has long puzzled scientists.

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