Related topics: biofuel

Brown University chemists simplify biodiesel conversion

As the United States seeks to lessen its reliance on foreign oil, biodiesel is expected to play a role. According to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, a branch of the Department of Energy, biodiesel "represents a ...

Algae cultivation technique could advance biofuels

Washington State University researchers have developed a way to grow algae more efficiently—in days instead of weeks—and make the algae more viable for several industries, including biofuels.

Researchers produce two biofuels from a single algae

A common algae commercially grown to make fish food holds promise as a source for both biodiesel and jet fuel, according to a new study published in the journal Energy & Fuels.

Could you run your car on coffee?

(Phys.org) —New research from our Centre for Sustainable Chemical Technologies shows that waste coffee grinds could be used to make biodiesel.

New, fossil-fuel-free process makes biodiesel sustainable

A new fuel-cell concept, developed by an Michigan State University researcher, will allow biodiesel plants to eliminate the creation of hazardous wastes while removing their dependence on fossil fuel from their production ...

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Biodiesel

Biodiesel refers to a vegetable oil or animal fat based diesel fuel consisting of long-chain alkyl (methyl, propyl or ethyl) esters. Biodiesel is typically made by chemically-reacting lipids (e.g., vegetable oil, animal fat (tallow)) and alcohol.

Biodiesel is meant to be used in standard diesel engines and is thus distinct from the vegetable and waste oils used to fuel converted diesel engines.

Biodiesel can be used alone, or blended with petrodiesel.

"Biodiesel" is standardized as mono-alkyl ester.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA