Explaining a universe composed of matter

The universe consists of a massive imbalance between matter and antimatter. Antimatter and matter are actually the same, but have opposite charges, but there's hardly any antimatter in the observable universe, including the ...

Observations challenge cosmological theories

Recent observations have created a puzzle for astrophysicists: Since the Big Bang, fewer galaxy clusters have formed over time than were actually expected. Physicists from the university of Bonn have now confirmed this phenomenon. ...

Breaking the symmetry between fundamental forces

A fraction of a second after the Big Bang, a single unified force may have shattered. Scientists from the CDF and DZero Collaborations used data from the Fermilab Tevatron Collider to re-create the early universe conditions. ...

Six decades of cosmology

"Cosmologists are often wrong but never in doubt," Russian physicist Lev Landau once said. In the early days, astronomers began by observing and modelling stars in different stages of evolution and comparing their findings ...

Why is massive star formation quenched in galaxy centers?

The current cosmological model to explain the universe, the "Big Bang" model, aims to describe all observable phenomena, including the evolution of galaxies from earliest times to the present day. One of the major problems ...

Using the universe as a 'cosmological collider' (Update)

Physicists are capitalizing on a direct connection between the largest cosmic structures and the smallest known objects to use the universe as a "cosmological collider" and investigate new physics.

Why is space three-dimensional?

(Phys.org)—The question of why space is three-dimensional (3D) and not some other number of dimensions has puzzled philosophers and scientists since ancient Greece. Space-time overall is four-dimensional, or (3 + 1)-dimensional, ...

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