The rich, the poor and social cooperation

The thicker the wallet, the more cooperative you are? An economist from the Max-Planck-Institute for Tax Law and Public Finance proves via laboratory experiments that rich people are believed to be more cooperative than poor ...

Investigating the power of group think

While many people might find it difficult, if not downright distasteful, to dive into 1.5 million hours of partisan talk radio, Clara Vandeweerdt found it thrilling.

Political affiliation may help drive and shape a person's morals

Which came first—the personal beliefs or the political party? While it may seem intuitive that a person's beliefs or moral compass may steer them toward one political party over another, a new study suggests it may be the ...

Expressing religious identity at work good for staff wellbeing

When employees are provided with a supportive environment to express their religious identity in the workplace they experience increased wellbeing and work more efficiently, according to a new research review from the London ...

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