Nudging does not necessarily improve decisions

Nudging, the concept of influencing people's behavior without imposing rules, bans or coercion, is an idea that government officials and marketing specialists alike are keen to harness, and itis often viewed as a one-size-fits-all ...

Rethinking school suspensions: School climate offers a clue

A 2012 study by the Everyone Graduates Center at John Hopkins University found that when a high school freshman receives a single suspension, their chances of dropping out of school can increase by a third. Furthermore, only ...

Researcher discusses the the science replication crisis

If there's a central tenet that unites all of the sciences, it's probably that scientists should approach discovery without bias and with a healthy dose of skepticism. The idea is that the best way to reach the truth is to ...

Richard Thaler wins Nobel for work in behavioral economics

The Nobel prize in economics was awarded Monday to Richard Thaler of the University of Chicago for research showing how people's choices on economic matters—whether on savings or game shows like "Deal or No Deal"—are ...

Workplace absence study proves we're not as selfish as we think

Research carried out by economists at the University of Aberdeen and the University of Bath has revealed that workers are significantly less likely to call in sick if they know their absence will cause difficulties for colleagues.

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