Scorpion venom to shuttle drugs into the brain

The Peptides and Proteins lab at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona) has published a paper in Chemical Communications describing the use of a peptide derived from chlorotoxin, found in scorpion venom ...

Determining America's most lethal animal

Animal attacks have been in the news a lot. Late last year, a 22-year-old student in New Jersey was killed by a black bear he had been photographing. This summer, swimmers off the coast of North Carolina have suffered a record ...

Romania keeps ancient tradition of bee medicine alive

Bee venom to combat multiple sclerosis, pollen for indigestion, honey to heal wounds—the humble bee has been a key source of alternative medicines since ancient times, and Romania is working to keep the tradition of "apitherapy" ...

Biophysicists zoom in on pore-forming toxin

A new study by Rice University biophysicists offers the most comprehensive picture yet of the molecular-level action of melittin, the principal toxin in bee venom. The research could aid in the development of new drugs that ...

Tumors feel the deadly sting of nanobees

(PhysOrg.com) -- When bees sting, they pump poison into their victims. Now the toxin in bee venom has been harnessed to kill tumor cells by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The researchers ...