New research shows some barnacles mate via spermcasting

(Phys.org)—A team of Canadian researchers has found that one species of barnacles mate by ejecting sperm into seawater while another catches it – a process known as spermcasting. Prior to this research, scientists had ...

Wild brown bear observed using a tool

(PhysOrg.com) -- Because brown bears are so reclusive, not to mention dangerous to be around, not a lot is really known about their brain power. This is actually rather odd because bears have the largest brains for their ...

Super sticky barnacle glue cures like blood clots

Barnacles are a big problem for boats. Adhering to the undersides of vessels, carpets of the crustaceans can increase fuel consumption by as much as 25%. Ship owners would love to know how to stop these hitchhikers gluing ...

Wild geese take climate action

Migratory animals are actively adjusting their traditions to climate change, new research has found.

In a warming climate, Arctic geese are rushing north

As Arctic temperatures continue to rise, migratory barnacle geese have responded by speeding up their 3,000-kilometer migration in order to reach their destination more quickly with fewer stops along the way, according to ...

Barnacles explain life at the extreme

Barnacles—a type of marine crustacean—are highly adaptable animals. Unlike many other groups that prefer quieter waters, they like areas with a lot of activity, are hardy against dry spells that sometimes occur in tidal ...

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Barnacle

Acrothoracica Thoracica Rhizocephala

Thyrostraca, Cirrhopoda (meaning "curl-footed"), Cirrhipoda, and Cirrhipedia.

A barnacle is a type of arthropod belonging to infraclass Cirripedia in the subphylum Crustacea, and is hence related to crabs and lobsters. Barnacles are exclusively marine, and tend to live in shallow and tidal waters, typically in erosive settings. They are sessile (non-motile) suspension feeders, and have two nektonic (active swimming) larval stages. Around 1,220 barnacle species are currently known. The name "Cirripedia" is Latin, meaning "curl-footed".

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