Dorian's floodwaters trap people in attics in North Carolina

A weakened Hurricane Dorian flooded homes on North Carolina's Outer Banks on Friday with a ferocity that took even storm-hardened residents by surprise, forcing people to retreat to their attics. Hundreds were feared trapped ...

Central banks are waking up to climate change dangers

The impact of climate change on the stability of individual financial institutions and the financial system in general is growing. It influences the types of activities that financial institutions will fund and the cost of ...

Negative interest rate policies are backfiring: new research

Negative interest rate policies—where nominal rates are set below zero percent—have been introduced in Europe and Japan to stimulate flagging economies but research from the University of Bath shows the unconventional ...

China may be on track to meet its carbon emissions goals early

China, the world's largest carbon emitter today, may be on track to meet its emission goals up to a decade early, according to a recent study on the cover of Nature Sustainability led by researchers from Nanjing University ...

Why green bonds could be key to fighting climate change

Finance has a role to play in confronting climate change, and green bonds could be one of the tools to do it. The idea behind green bonds is not complicated, but the application of this simple financial mechanism could be ...

ECB charts path for new stimulus

The European Central Bank signaled Thursday it could unleash a new stimulus package and slash rates further, in a bid to shore up stubbornly low inflation and kickstart sluggish growth in the eurozone.

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Bank

A bank is a financial institution that serves as a financial intermediary. The term "bank" may refer to one of several related types of entities:

Because of the important role depository institutions play in the financial system, the banking industry is generally regulated with government restrictions on financial activities by banks varied over time and by location. Current global bank capital requirements are referred to as Basel II. In some countries, such as Germany, banks have historically owned major stakes in industrial companies, while in other countries, such as the United States, banks have traditionally been prohibited from owning non-financial companies. In Japan, banks are usually the nexus of a cross-share holding entity known as the "keiretsu". In Iceland, banks followed international standards of regulation prior to the recent global financial crisis that began in 2007.

The oldest bank still in existence is Monte dei Paschi di Siena, headquartered in Siena, Italy, which has been operating continuously since 1472.

A Bank's main source of income is interest paid on loans. A bank pays out at a lower interest rate on deposits and receives a higher interest rate on loans. The difference between these rates represents the bank's net income. Banks also generate non-interest income from service fees for Retail and Business banking products, transactional fees, or other non-traditional services such as Trust and Wealth Management consulting, Insurance, Cash Management services, Mortgage loan closing costs and points.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA