The global transport of microbes

Wastewater, tourism, and trade are moving microbes around the globe at an unprecedented scale, a group of international researchers, including Professor Michael Gillings from Macquarie University, have argued. The editorial ...

Day of reckoning for marine invaders

For centuries, marine species have moved around either by hitching ride on the hulls of ships or as stowaways in ballast water. In many instances, species have been deliberately introduced for aquaculture or other commercial ...

Tracking invasive species? Follow the people

Islands and populated coastal areas are the world's "hotspots" for invasive species, which can upend entire ecosystems and drive local animals and plants to extinction, a study reported Monday.

44 invading species 'loose' in North Atlantic, study shows

Accidental introductions of non-native species has been of increasing concern since the 1980s when human-mediated transportation, mainly related to ships' ballast water, was recognised as a major route by which species are ...

House measure supports shippers on ballast water dumping

A plan gaining support in Congress and backed by the cargo shipping industry would establish a nationwide policy for dumping ballast water into U.S. waterways that environmental groups say would open the door to more invasive ...

A DNA analysis of ballast water detects invasive species

The German research vessel Polarstern covers thousands of kilometres between the northern and southern hemispheres in search of samples of biological material. This ship, however, has some other onboard passengers: organisms ...

Court orders EPA to revise ship ballast dumping regulations

A federal appeals court ordered the government Monday to rewrite its regulations on ballast water discharges from ships, one of the leading culprits in the spread of invasive species across U.S. waterways.

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