Engineered viruses could fight drug resistance

In the battle against antibiotic resistance, many scientists have been trying to deploy naturally occurring viruses called bacteriophages that can infect and kill bacteria.

Opening Pandora's Box: Gene editing and its consequences

Today, the scientific community is aghast at the prospect of gene editing to create "designer" humans. Gene editing may be of greater consequence than climate change, or even the consequences of unleashing the energy of the ...

Viruses discern, destroy E. coli in drinking water

To rapidly detect the presence of E. coli in drinking water, Cornell University food scientists now can employ a bacteriophage—a genetically engineered virus—in a test used in hard-to-reach areas around the world.

Virus genes from city pond rescue bacteria

A key question in evolutionary biology is how new functions arise. New research at Uppsala University, Sweden, shows that bacteriophages (viruses that infect bacteria) can contribute to new functions by revealing hidden potential ...

Workbench for virus design

ETH researchers have developed a technology platform that allows them to systematically modify and customise bacteriophages. This technology is a step towards making phage therapies a powerful tool for combating dangerous ...

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