Why bacterial toxins are 'fascinating machines of death'

The coronavirus pandemic is a daily reminder of the consequences brought by a successful invasion of human cells by a pathogen. As new research on bacterial toxins shows, it does not take much for these encounters to turn ...

Bacteria breakthrough could lead to new biomaterials

Physicists at the Australian National University (ANU) have found a way to manipulate the growth of bacterial biofilms—one of the most abundant forms of life on earth.

Surface protein editing in bacteria

University of Minnesota researchers have discovered this previously unknown signaling pathway that regulates surface proteins on bacteria that can lead to new targets for antibiotics.

Filming how our immune system kill bacteria

To kill bacteria in the blood, our immune system relies on nanomachines that can open deadly holes in their targets. UCL scientists have now filmed these nanomachines in action, discovering a key bottleneck in the process ...

Helium ions reveal how viruses attack bacteria

An interdisciplinary research consortium from the Nanoscience Center at University of Jyvaskyla in Finland (group leaders Dr. Lotta-Riina Sundberg and Prof. Ilari Maasilta) has found that bacteria and viruses can be imaged ...

How a bacterial virulence factor promotes its own secretion

In adhering to body cells, many bacteria cause disease. Antibiotics are the usual means for treating infection, but decades of use have led to increasing bacterial resistance. Therefore, scientists are looking at other strategies.

page 1 from 3