Organic infrared photodetectors offer advance in imaging technology

The demand for high pixel-count, low-cost focal-plane arrays in the near-infrared (NIR) and short-wavelength infrared (SWIR) spectra has surged due to their potential applications in AI-driven technologies such as 3D face-identification, ...

Elegant use of noise for quantum computing

Scientists around the world work hard to rinse quantum systems for noise, which may disturb the function of tomorrow's powerful quantum computers. Researchers from the Niels Bohr Institute (NBI) have found a way to use noise ...

Physicists develop highly robust time crystal

A team from TU Dortmund University recently succeeded in producing a highly durable time crystal that lived millions of times longer than could be shown in previous experiments. By doing so, they have corroborated an extremely ...

New quantum optics technique sheds light on polariton interactions

An international collaboration, led by Macquarie University scientists, has introduced a new quantum optics technique that can provide unprecedented access to the fundamental properties of light-matter interactions in semiconductors.

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Arsenide

Arsenide is an arsenic anion with the charge −3. The trianion is formed by the reduction of arsenic by three electrons. For example heating arsenic powder with excess sodium gives sodium arsenide (Na3As). The anions have no existence in solution since they are extremely basic. These solid salts have very high lattice energies.

An arsenide (compound) is a compound with arsenic in oxidation state −3, but the term is used loosely. The mineral sperrylite (PtAs2) is called a platinum arsenide, but the formal oxidation state for arsenic is −2. because the solid is usually described as Pt4+,As24-. The description of gallium arsenide (GaAs) is more straightforward since it features isolated arsenic centers.

Arsenides are toxic because of the inherent toxicity of arsenic and all of its compounds.

Metal arsenides react with acids to form highly toxic arsine gas.

See category for a list.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA