Related topics: satellite · climate change · sea ice · climate models · arctic

Climate science update: bad news gets worse

Scientists monitoring Earth's climate and environment have delivered a cascade of grim news in 2017, adding to the urgency of UN talks in Bonn next week tasked with ramping up efforts to tame global warming.

Under the sea ice, behold the ancient Arctic jellyfish

The doings of creatures under the Arctic sea ice are many, but they are rarely observed by humans; it's pretty hard to get under the ice to look. In recent years, marine biologist Andy Juhl and his colleagues have gotten ...

Monster discovered in Canadian Arctic

A University of Manitoba graduate student discovered Canada's first, genuine, scientifically sound monster lurking under our Arctic sea ice.

End-of-summer Arctic sea ice extent is eighth lowest on record

Arctic sea ice appeared to have reached its yearly lowest extent on Sept. 13, NASA and the NASA-supported National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) at the University of Colorado Boulder have reported. Analysis of satellite ...

Arctic sea ice once again shows considerable melting

This September, the extent of Arctic sea ice shrank to roughly 4.7 million square kilometres, as was determined by researchers at the Alfred Wegener Institute, the University of Bremen and Universität Hamburg. Though slightly ...

Unraveling a major cause of sea ice retreat in the Arctic Ocean

Ice-covered sea areas in the Arctic Ocean during summer have nearly halved since the 1970s and 1980s, raising alarm that the ocean is shifting from a multiyear to a seasonal ice zone. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate ...

AWI's underwater robot Tramper successfully recovered

On 27 August 2017, deep-sea researchers from the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) recovered the underwater robot Tramper, which had been taking measurements at a depth of 2435 ...

NASA scientists seek to improve sea ice predictions

Sea ice in the Arctic Ocean is in a downward spiral, with summer minimum extents about 40 percent smaller than in the 1980s. But predicting how the sea ice is going to behave in a particular year is tricky: There are still ...

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