Related topics: satellite · climate change · sea ice · climate models · arctic

Polar vortex defies climate change in the Southeast

Overwhelming scientific evidence has demonstrated that our planet is getting warmer due to climate change, yet parts of the eastern U.S. are actually getting cooler. According to a Dartmouth-led study in Geophysical Research ...

NASA's longest running survey of ice shattered records in 2017

Last year was a record-breaking one for Operation IceBridge, NASA's aerial survey of the state of polar ice. For the first time in its nine-year history, the mission, which aims to close the gap between two NASA satellite ...

Sea ice algae blooms in the dark

Researchers from Aarhus University have measured a new world record: Small ice algae on the underside of the Arctic sea ice live and grow at a light level corresponding to only 0.02 percent of the light at the surface of ...

Weather anomalies accelerate the melting of sea ice

In the winter of 2015/16, something happened that had never before been seen on this scale: at the end of December, temperatures rose above zero degrees Celsius for several days in parts of the Arctic. Temperatures of up ...

Arctic sea ice affects and is affected by mid-latitude weather

Changes in Arctic sea ice have a direct impact on lower atmospheric conditions in the region. However, possible higher altitude and lower latitude impacts of changing sea ice are less well understood. Assessing such far-flung ...

Arctic sea ice loss could dry out California

Arctic sea ice loss of the magnitude expected in the next few decades could impact California's rainfall and exacerbate future droughts, according to new research led by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) scientists.

Science update on climate change: from bad to worse

Scientists monitoring the Earth's climate and environment have delivered a cascade of grim news this year, adding a sense of urgency to UN talks on how best to draw down the greenhouse gases that drive global warming.

2017 set to be hottest non-El Nino year: UN

2017 is on track to be the hottest year on record except for two warmed by El Nino phenomena, the UN's World Meteorological Organization said Monday.

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