Rediscovering Saskatchewan's scientific heritage

Gathered together from every corner of the University of Saskatchewan (USask) Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, the unique collection of scientific artifacts fills two rooms in the Physics Building.

ARCHANGEL: Securing UK national archives with AI and blockchain

The University of Surrey is using its state-of-the-art blockchain and artificial intelligence technologies to secure the digital government records of national archives across the globe—including the UK, Australia and the ...

Your internet data is rotting

Many MySpace users were dismayed to discover earlier this year that the social media platform lost 50 million files uploaded between 2003 and 2015.

Exploring 3-D technology in pottery studies: 'It is the future'

In the depots of the Faculty of Archaeology, many artifacts, accumulated after decades of fieldwork across Europe and the Middle East, are stored. A new project, the Leiden Inventory Depot (LID), aims to unlock this wealth ...

How music listening affects the climate

CD listening has been replaced by music streaming. Has the change in music consumption been good for the climate? The answer might surprise you.

The death penalty, an American tradition on the decline

Capital punishment has been practiced on American soil for more than 400 years. Historians have documented nearly 16,000 executions, accomplished by burning, hanging, firing squad, electrocution, lethal gas and lethal injection. ...

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Archive

An archive is a collection of historical records, or the physical place they are located. Archives contain primary source documents that have accumulated over the course of an individual or organization's lifetime, and are kept to show the function of an organization.

In general, archives consist of records that have been selected for permanent or long-term preservation on grounds of their enduring cultural, historical, or evidentiary value. Archival records are normally unpublished and almost always unique, unlike books or magazines for which many identical copies exist. This means that archives (the places) are quite distinct from libraries with regard to their functions and organization, although archival collections can often be found within library buildings.

A person who works in archives is called an archivist. The study and practice of organizing, preserving, and providing access to information and materials in archives is called archival science.

When referring to historical records or the places they are kept, the plural form archives is chiefly used. Archivists tend to prefer the term "archives" (with an S) as the correct terminology to serve as both the singular and plural, since "archive," as a noun or a verb, has acquired meanings related to computer science.[citation needed]

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA