How 'bling' makes us human

Sparkly jewelry, expensive shoes, designer watches – who doesn't love a bit of "bling?"

Reconstructing an ancient lethal weapon

Archaeologists are a little like forensic investigators: They scour the remains of past societies, looking for clues in pottery, tools and bones about how people lived, and how they died.

Early culture shaped by migration and population growth

Something odd happened in the transition from the Middle to the Upper Paleolithic, around 50,000 years ago. Modern humans and their immediate ancestors had been using tools for a few million years prior, but the repertoire ...

Remains of rice and mung beans help solve a Madagascan mystery

Researchers have helped solve one of the enduring mysteries of the ancient world: why the inhabitants of Madagascar speak Malagasy, a language otherwise unique to Southeast Asia and the Pacific - a region located at least ...

Biologists trace how human innovation impacts tool evolution

Many animals exhibit learned behaviors, but humans are unique in their capacity to build on existing knowledge to make new innovations. Understanding the patterns of how new generations of tools emerged in prehistoric societies, ...

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