Study explores how Native Americans used sea otters

University of Oregon scientists are probing archaeological evidence for how indigenous peoples used sea otters, and their findings could help Alaskans confront growing numbers of the mammals and Oregonians who want to reintroduce ...

Beads made of boa bones identified in lesser Antilles

Today boa snakes have a patchy distribution in the islands that form the Lesser Antilles in the Caribbean Sea, but the constrictors are nearly absent from archaeological deposits in the region. Whether this scarcity is due ...

Amazonian crops domesticated 10,000 years ago

As agriculture emerged in early civilizations, crops were domesticated in four locations around the world—rice in China; grains and pulses in the Middle East; maize, beans and squash in Mesoamerica; and potatoes and quinoa ...

Mesoamerican copper smelting technology aided colonial weaponry

When Spanish invaders arrived in the Americas, they were generally able to subjugate the local peoples thanks, in part, to their superior weaponry and technology. But archeological evidence indicates that, in at least one ...

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Archaeological record

The archaeological record is a term used in archaeology to denote all archaeological evidence, including the physical remains of past human activities which archaeologists seek out and record in an attempt to analyze and reconstruct the past. In the main it denotes buried remains unearthed during excavation.

The archaeological record on a specific archaeological site is sometimes referred to as the archaeological sequence, or sequence for short. However, the two terms are not exactly interchangeable as the term archaeological record is more global in its meaning and can be applied to artifacts and other evidence such as biofacts and manuports and their associated relationships, as well as the stratigraphy of a site; in contrast, the sequence really refers to the timeline, determined by stratigraphy and/or absolute dating methods.

Thus the archaeological record consists of both known and unknown archaeological sites, with material preserved in-situ; of conserved material such as artifacts in museums and collections as well as archives of archaeological research and interpretation. Records, and the physical results of experimental archaeology also form part of the archaeological record.

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