New tool removes chemotherapy drugs from water systems

'What goes in, must come out' is a familiar refrain. It is especially pertinent to the challenges facing UBC researchers who are investigating methods to remove chemicals and pharmaceuticals from public water systems.

Single-cell test can reveal precisely how drugs kill cancer cells

Cancer cells are smart when it comes to anti-cancer drugs, evolving and becoming resistant to even the strongest chemotherapies over time. To combat this evasive behavior, researchers have developed a method named D2O-probed ...

Scientists discover new anti-cancer molecule

A group of Moscow scientists has discovered and explained the activity mechanism of a new anti-cancer molecule—diphenylisoxazole. This molecule has been shown to be effective against human cancer cells. The research, published ...

Nanopore reveals shape-shifting enzyme linked to catalysis

University of Groningen scientists have observed the characteristics of a single enzyme inside a nanopore. They learned that the enzyme can exist in four different folded states, or conformers, that play an active role in ...

Protecting DNA origami for anti-cancer drug delivery

Scientists have designed and synthesized chains of molecules with a precise sequence and length to efficiently protect 3-D DNA nanostructures from structural degradation under a variety of biomedically relevant conditions. ...

Cells protect themselves against stress by keeping together

Cell-to-cell contacts are necessary for the survival of human cells under protein-damaging conditions and stress. This was one of the conclusions made by a research team working under the leadership of Lea Sistonen, Professor ...

Study weighs deep-sea mining's impact on microbes

The essential roles that microbes play in deep-sea ecosystems are at risk from the potential environmental impacts of mining, a new paper in Limnology and Oceanography reports. The study reviews what is known about microbes ...

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