Marine Skin dives deeper for better monitoring

A new and greatly improved version of an electronic tag, called Marine Skin, used for monitoring marine animals could revolutionize our ability to study sea life and its natural environment, say KAUST researchers.

Giant squid gets makeover before showtime

A little elbow grease, some formaldehyde, and a lot of ingenuity—that's what it took for taxidermists at the Museum of Natural History to prettify a giant squid along with a coelacanth, a rare fish known as the "living ...

Medieval inks for heritage conservation

The fact that historical archives, libraries, museums, writing workshops and even monasteries, currently conserve medieval manuscripts is not only a question of heroes or ordinary people who went through the trouble to save ...

Reconstructing skin on a chip

Microfluidics could fulfill a growing need for alternatives to animal testing for the development of pharmaceuticals and cosmetics. A multidisciplinary team, led by Zhiping Wang from the A*STAR Singapore Institute of Manufacturing ...

New method maps chemicals in the skin

A new method of examining the skin can reduce the number of animal experiments while providing new opportunities to develop pharmaceuticals and cosmetics. Chemical imaging allows all layers of the skin to be seen and the ...

Stem cells in plants and animals behave surprisingly similarly

A new study from Lund University in Sweden shows that the behaviour of stem cells in plants and animals is surprisingly similar. The researchers were able to produce mathematical equations that reveal very small differences ...

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