It doesn't pay to play angry when negotiating: study

Anger, the faux, feigned kind, has been a tool in negotiations for generations. The idea that pretending to be angry can coerce the counterpart into conceding to your terms. Those thinking about using such a tool, though, ...

Developing tools to combat 'fake news'

With news coverage being a constant cycle and information being amplified across social media channels, it can be difficult to discern between sound news and 'fake news.' As a result people's trust in scientific information ...

'Moral' anger is a force for good at work

Employers should embrace anger among employees for the vital role it plays in sustaining a just and fair workplace, according to a University of Liverpool academic.

A goosebump sensor that reads your emotions

People get goosebumps when they feel a sudden surge of emotion. Goosebumps are due to the shrinkage of the skin cells around hairs, making the hairs stand on end. Animals, such as lions and cats, develop the goosebumps or ...

Feeling bad at work can be a good thing

(Phys.org) —Research by the University of Liverpool suggests that, contrary to popular opinion, it can be good to feel bad at work, whilst feeling good in the workplace can also lead to negative outcomes.

The role of wrath in modern social movements

Wrath is commonly considered to be an inhuman, violent, and irrational vice which can frequently overcome self-control. As one of the seven deadly sins, the advantages to wrath are hard to come by.

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Anger

Anger is an emotional state that may range from minor irritation to intense rage. The physical effects of anger include increased heart rate, blood pressure, and levels of adrenaline and noradrenaline. Some view anger as part of the fight or flight brain response to the perceived threat of harm. Anger becomes the predominant feeling behaviorally, cognitively and physiologically when a person makes the conscious choice to take action to immediately stop the threatening behavior of another outside force. The English term originally comes from the term angr of Old Norse language. Anger can lead to many things physically and mentally.

The external expression of anger can be found in facial expressions, body language, physiological responses, and at times in public acts of aggression. Humans and non-human animals for example make loud sounds, attempt to look physically larger, bare their teeth, and stare. Anger is a behavioral pattern designed to warn aggressors to stop their threatening behavior. Rarely does a physical altercation occur without the prior expression of anger by at least one of the participants. While most of those who experience anger explain its arousal as a result of "what has happened to them," psychologists point out that an angry person can be very well mistaken because anger causes a loss in self-monitoring capacity and objective observability.

Modern psychologists view anger as a primary, natural, and mature emotion experienced by all humans at times, and as something that has functional value for survival. Anger can mobilize psychological resources for corrective action. Uncontrolled anger can however negatively affect personal or social well-being. While many philosophers and writers have warned against the spontaneous and uncontrolled fits of anger, there has been disagreement over the intrinsic value of anger. Dealing with anger has been addressed in the writings of earliest philosophers up to modern times. Modern psychologists, in contrast to the earlier writers, have also pointed out the possible harmful effects of suppression of anger. Displays of anger can be used as a manipulation strategy for social influence.

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