Related topics: alcohol · binge drinking · drinking · breast cancer · cancer

Among India's working poor, sobriety may boost savings

Trying to stay sober does not change the earnings of some workers—but it does increase the amount of money they save, according to an MIT economist's field experiment about low-income workers in India.

Using mobile data to model the drinking habits of Swiss youth

Researchers from Idiap Research Institute and EPFL have carried out a study using smartphone data from young Swiss people to better understand the circumstances in which they are most likely to drink. A computer model developed ...

New report shows compelling reasons to decriminalise sex work

We recently studied the health and safety of sex workers in Western Australia. While such a study was conducted in 2007, we were interested to see if the sex industry had changed in the past decade, and to learn more about ...

Excessive alcohol use continues to be drain on American economy

Excessive alcohol use continues to be a drain on the American economy, according to a study released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Excessive drinking cost the U.S. $249 billion in 2010, or $2.05 ...

Yes, you can make alcohol from Vegemite, but ...

Vegemite has been in the news of late for all the wrong reasons. It all started when Minister for Indigenous Affairs Nigel Scullion said he'd heard the yeast extract was being used in dry communities to brew alcohol.

Majority of people in Britain harmed by other people's drinking

A new report from the University of Sheffield Alcohol Research Group and the Institute of Alcohol Studies (IAS) has revealed more than half of Scots and three-quarters of people from North West England are harmed by another ...

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Alcoholic beverage

An alcoholic beverage is a drink that contains ethanol (commonly called alcohol). Alcoholic beverages are divided into three general classes: beers, wines, and spirits.

Alcoholic beverages are consumed in almost every nation, and most nations have laws that regulate their production, sale, and consumption.

In particular, such laws specify the minimum age at which a person may legally buy or drink alcoholic beverages. This minimum age can be as low as 16 years, as in Austria, Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, the Netherlands, and Switzerland. Most nations, however, set the minimum age at 18 years.

In the United States, the minimum age is 21 years.

Alcoholic beverages are a part of most European cultures, and children in these cultures may occasionally drink alcohol during meals with their family. In Germany, 14-year-old persons may drink low-alcohol beverages if their parents are present.

The production and consumption of alcohol occurs in most cultures of the world, from hunter-gatherer peoples to nation-states. Alcoholic beverages are often an important part of social events in these cultures. In many cultures, drinking plays a significant role in social interaction — mainly because of alcohol’s neurological effects.

Alcohol is a psychoactive drug that has a depressant effect. A high blood alcohol content is usually considered to be legal drunkenness because it reduces attention and slows reaction speed. Alcoholic beverages can be addictive, and the state of addiction to alcohol is known as alcoholism.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA