Using the sun and agricultural waste to control pests

Farmers spend a lot of time and money controlling weeds and other pests, and often have to turn to chemical fumigants to keep the most destructive pests at bay. Farmers also wrestle with what to do with low-value byproducts ...

New study touts agricultural, environmental benefits of biochar

The many benefits of a biomass-made material called biochar are highlighted in a new publication in which Ghasideh Pourhashem, assistant professor at NDSU's Department of Coatings and Polymeric Materials and Center for Sustainable ...

Massive need for growing trees on farms

It's now over 50 years since the world was first warned that resources were being used at an unsustainable rate. It has now been estimated that almost one quarter to one third of the world's land is degraded to some extent.

Why do some plants live fast and die young?

An international team led by researchers at The University of Manchester have discovered why some plants "live fast and die young" whilst others have long and healthy lives.

When roots crack and worms crunch

Roots can be "listened to" while growing – and worms when burrowing. Researchers from ETH Zurich and the French National Institute for Agricultural Research present a new method for soil analysis.

Soil bugs munch on plastics

The world is drowning in a flood of plastic. Eight million tons of plastic end up in the oceans every year. Agricultural soils are also threatened by plastic pollution. Farmers around the world apply enormous amounts of polyethylene ...

Ancient agricultural activity caused lasting environmental changes

Agricultural activity by humans more than 2,000 years ago had a more significant and lasting impact on the environment than previously thought. The finding— discovered by a team of international researchers led by the University ...

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