US climate sceptics send shivers through Arctic cooperation

For the first time in over two decades, member states of the Arctic Council failed to agree on a final declaration at their bi-annual ministerial meeting on Tuesday, due to a US refusal to mention climate change.

Face off—Cyclists not human enough for drivers: study

A new Australian study has found that more than half of car drivers think cyclists are not completely human, with a link between the dehumanisation of bike riders and acts of deliberate aggression towards them on the road.

Australian police hunt killer of giant crocodile

A manhunt has begun for the killer of a giant saltwater crocodile in Australia, as authorities warned its death would trigger more aggressive behaviour among younger crocs in the area.

Delayed weaning reduces behavioural problems in cats

Early weaning increases aggression and stereotypic behaviour in cats, shows a new study from Professor Hannes Lohi's research group. Based on the study conducted at the University of Helsinki, the recommended weaning age ...

Spotting risky behavior crucial in cutting road accidents

Road safety and accident prevention are not always studied from the same perspective, though it may be obvious that accident-related events are linked to risky behaviour. David Herrero, author of a new eight-year study, says, ...

Combating the rise of the urban gull

Academics and students from the University of the West of England (UWE Bristol) have begun a unique project studying the interaction between humans and urban gulls. A team of psychology undergraduates will monitor the birds ...

page 1 from 4

Aggression

In psychology, as well as other social and behavioral sciences, aggression refers to behavior between members of the same species that is intended to cause pain or harm. Predatory or defensive behavior between members of different species is not normally considered "aggression." Aggression takes a variety of forms among humans and can be physical, mental, or verbal. Aggression should not be confused with assertiveness, although the terms are often used interchangeably among laypeople, e.g. an aggressive salesperson.

There are two broad categories of aggression. These include hostile, affective, or retaliatory aggression and instrumental, predatory, or goal-oriented aggression. Empirical research indicates that there is a critical difference between the two, both psychologically and physiologically. Some research indicates that people with tendencies toward affective aggression have lower IQs than those with tendencies toward predatory aggression. If only considering physical aggression, males tend to be more aggressive than females. One explanation for this difference is that females are physically weaker than men, and so need to resort to other means.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA