Bats use weighty wings to land upside down

Compared to birds and insects, bats have heavy wings for their body size. Those comparatively cumbersome flappers might seem a detriment to maneuverability, but new research shows that bats' extra wing mass makes possible ...

NTSB: Company should have prepared for human error

The developer of the commercial spacecraft that broke apart during a test flight over California's Mojave Desert last year failed to protect against human error, specifically the co-pilot unlocking a braking system too quickly ...

Weight riddle solved by Stanford bird wing test

A new instrument may help to carry out tests to optimize miniature drones, in attempts to assess their flight performance more precisely. A team from Stanford University have shown how flapping wings enable flying animals ...

Investigators wrap site work in spaceship crash

Federal investigators who have been in the Mojave Desert trying to find out why an experimental spaceship crashed are wrapping up their work in Southern California.

Muscle power: Bats power take-off using recycled energy

Bats are uniquely able to stretch and store energy in their bicep and tricep tendons during take-off and climbing flight, giving them an extra power boost. A new study on fruitbats, to be presented at the meeting of the Society ...

Smart helicopter thanks to active rotor blades

Active systems in helicopter rotor blades can adapt the blades' aerodynamic properties to local airflow conditions. The use of such systems leads to lower fuel consumption, increased maximum speed and reduced noise and vibration. ...

Researchers build robotic bat wing (w/ video)

The strong, flapping flight of bats offers great possibilities for the design of small aircraft, among other applications. By building a robotic bat wing, Brown researchers have uncovered flight secrets of real bats: the ...

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