Pulsed electron beams shed light on plastics production

Plastics are all around us—they make up our water bottles, trash bags, packing materials, toys, containers, and more. About 300 million tons of plastic are produced worldwide each year, yet the details of what goes on at ...

Hard carbon nanofiber aerogel becomes superelastic

Conductive and compressible carbon aerogels are useful in a variety of applications. In recent decades, carbon aerogels have been widely explored by using graphitic carbons and soft carbons, which show advantages in superelasticity. ...

Lithium ions flow through solid material

Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, in collaboration with researchers from Purdue University and Rutgers University, have merged materials science and condensed matter physics ...

Nanovaccine boosts immunity in sufferers of metabolic syndrome

A new class of biomaterial developed by Cornell researchers for an infectious disease nanovaccine effectively boosted immunity in mice with metabolic disorders linked to gut bacteria – a population that shows resistance ...

A self-healing composite

Researchers from EPFL's Laboratory for Processing of Advanced Composites have developed a material that can easily heal after being damaged. This cutting-edge composite could be used in aircraft, wind turbines, cars and sports ...

3-D experiments shed new light on shape memory alloys

Shape memory alloys are well known for their remarkable properties—superelasticity, shape memory and actuation allow them to be crumpled up and then spring back to a "remembered" original shape.

Scientists boost stability of low-cost, large-area solar modules

Scientists at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) have resolved a fundamental weakness in a promising solar technology known as Perovskite Solar Cells, or PSCs. Their innovations appear ...

Cultivating 4-D tissues—the self-curving cornea

Scientists at Newcastle University have developed a biological system which lets cells form a desired shape by moulding their surrounding material—in the first instance creating a self-curving cornea.

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Advanced Materials

Advanced Materials is a peer-reviewed materials science journal published every two weeks. It includes Communications, Reviews, and Feature Articles from the cutting edge of materials science, including topics in chemistry, physics, nanotechnology, ceramics, metallurgy, and biomaterials, and is one of the most heavily cited journals in this multidisciplinary field.

The journal was founded in 1988 as a supplement in the general chemistry journal Angewandte Chemie and remained in that journal for the first 18 months of its existence. The Founding Editor was Dr. Peter Goelitz (the Editor of Angewandte Chemie). Dr Peter Gregory was the Editor from 1991 until 2002 and he was succeeded by Dr. Esther Levy from 2002 to 2006. In 2007 Peter Gregory returned as Editor.

The editorial office is in Weinheim, near Heidelberg in Germany, from where the peer review process is coordinated by an editorial team made up of chemists, physicists, and engineers.

The 2007 ISI Impact Factor of Advanced Materials was 8.191.

Frequent topics covered by the journal also include liquid crystals, semiconductors, superconductors, optics, lasers, sensors, mesoporous materials, shape memory alloys, light-emitting materials, magnetic materials, thin films, and colloids.

Other journals in the Advanced Materials family are:

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