A hydrogel that can stop bleeding from an artery

A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in China has developed a hydrogel that can stop bleeding from a punctured artery. In their paper published in the journal Nature Communications, the group describes ...

Surface protein editing in bacteria

University of Minnesota researchers have discovered this previously unknown signaling pathway that regulates surface proteins on bacteria that can lead to new targets for antibiotics.

Eco-friendly formulations based on vegetable oils

There is an increasing demand for green products, but for them to be genuinely sustainable, manufacturers must also use adhesives and paints that are made of bio-based feedstocks. Advanced materials developed in Fraunhofer ...

The sticky science of underwater adhesives

Mussels stick to rocks on the seafloor, to aquatic plants, and—to the consternation of boaters—they can hitch rides fastened to seafaring vessels no matter their composition: metals, rubber, glass, wood and more.

Slug glue reveals clues for making better medical adhesives

The Dusky Arion slug produces a defensive glue that fouls the mouthparts of any would-be predator. Two new studies reveal more about how this glue achieves its strong sticking power and flexibility, insights that could be ...

New bioinspired glue bonds any surface underwater

Underwater adhesion is technically challenging because of the presence of water, the worst enemy for any glue. Now, scientists from Wageningen University & Research have developed an injectable adhesive able to bond to many ...

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Adhesion

Adhesion is any attraction process between dissimilar molecular species that can potentially bring them in close contact. By contrast, cohesion takes place between similar molecules.

Adhesion is the tendency of dissimilar particles and/or surfaces to cling to one another (cohesion refers to the tendency of similar or identical particles/surfaces to cling to one another). The forces that cause adhesion and cohesion can be divided into several types. The intermolecular forces responsible for the function of various kinds of stickers and sticky tape fall into the categories of chemical adhesion, dispersive adhesion, and diffusive adhesion. In addition to the cumulative magnitudes of these intermolecular forces, there are certain emergent mechanical effects that will also be discussed at the end of the article.

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