New robot can sense plankton optically and acoustically

Oceanographers and engineers at the University of California San Diego collaborated to modify a common physical oceanography instrument to be able to image zooplankton as it glides through the ocean.

Study shows whales dine with their own kind

For a few weeks in early fall, Georges Bank—a vast North Atlantic fishery off the coast of Cape Cod—teems with billions of herring that take over the region to spawn. The seasonal arrival of the herring also attracts ...

Military sonar can alter blue whale behavior

Some blue whales off the coast of California change their behavior when exposed to the sort of underwater sounds used during U.S. military exercises. The whales may alter diving behavior or temporarily avoid important feeding ...

Using earthquake sensors to track endangered whales

(Phys.org) —The fin whale is the second-largest animal ever to live on Earth. It is also, paradoxically, one of the least understood. The animal's huge size and global range make its movements and behavior hard to study.

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