How comb jellies adapted to life in the deep sea

Washed up on a beach, a comb jelly or ctenophore (pronounced "teen-oh-four") might look like a little transparent grape. But ctenophores are extremely diverse, living from the equator to the poles and from the ocean surface ...

Key acid-activated protein channel identified

Johns Hopkins researchers have discovered a long-sought protein, the proton-activated chloride channel (PAC), that is activated in acidic environments and could protect against the tissue-damaging effects of stroke, heart ...

Virulence factor of the influenza A virus mapped in real-time

The influenza A viruses, which are responsible for deadly pandemics in the past, still remain a major global public health problem today. Molecules known as virulence factors are produced by bacteria, viruses, and fungi to ...

Mining microbial treasures from toxic sites

Filled with a noxious brew of copper, cadmium and arsenic, with a pH rivaling that of sulfuric acid, Montana's Berkeley Pit seems inhospitable to life. Nonetheless, scientists have discovered microorganisms in this abandoned ...

Bile acid-triggered bacterial adaptation characterized

When bacteria enter the digestive tracts of their hosts, including humans, they encounter a highly acidic environment. Bacteria have evolved elegant mechanisms to survive and colonize this habitat, such as highly resistant ...

A microbe's membrane helps it survive extreme environments

Within harsh environments like hot springs, volcanic craters and deep-sea hydrothermal vents – uninhabitable by most life forms – microscopic organisms are thriving. How? It's all in how they wrap themselves.

Electric shocks kill bacteria

Low temperatures and an acidic environment create the ideal conditions for an effective method of inactivating Listeria (and other germs) in the processing of whey protein solutions – without destroying valuable nutrients. ...

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