Solid acetylene reagent for laboratory applications

Acetylene is one of the primary starting materials for chemical synthesis. However, acetylene is a highly flammable gas, dangerous and difficult to use in regular research laboratories. A novel solid acetylene regent has ...

New uses for abandoned molecule calcium carbide

A joint project of scientists from Russia has investigated chemical applications of calcium carbide. The project advances the idea of diverse acetylene chemistry on the basis of carbide technology. Using the proposed approach, ...

Carbon nanotubes grow in combustion flames

Professor Stephan Irle of the Institute of Transformative Bio-Molecules (WPI-ITbM) at Nagoya University and co-workers at Kyoto University, Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL), and Chinese research institutions have revealed through ...

Iron-sulfur enzymes as candidates for antibiotic development

The iron-sulfur protein IspH plays a central role in the terpene metabolism of several pathogens. The mechanism of the reaction provides an approach for developing new antibiotics, particularly against malaria and tuberculosis. ...

Non-equilibrium quantum states in atmospheric chemistry

(Phys.org)—Research that sheds new light on the microscopic chemical physics driving one of the most important reaction sequences in atmospheric chemistry is published in Science today by Dr David Glowacki from the University ...

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Acetylene

Acetylene (systematic name: ethyne) is the chemical compound with the formula C2H2. It is a hydrocarbon and the simplest alkyne. This colorless gas is widely used as a fuel and a chemical building block. It is unstable in pure form and thus is usually handled as a solution.

As an alkyne, acetylene is unsaturated because its two carbon atoms are bonded together in a triple bond. The carbon-carbon triple bond places all four atoms in the same straight line, with CCH bond angles of 180°. Since acetylene is a linear symmetrical molecule, it possesses the D∞h point group.

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